Pangai-Noon

Here’s a video I watched as a basis for a little self-study project.  I know that the fighting style, Pangai-Noon, is the origin of Uechi-Ryu and Shohei-Ryu.  It’s what Kanbun Uechi studied on mainland China.  I know that it’s much softer and more akin to king-fu than karate.  Now I know it’s fun to watch, too, but I don’t know much about its form or effectiveness.  I can see similarities to the Okinawan styles I’m familiar with, but it seems the moves featured in this video have many different emphasis.

I hope to read more about the origins of Pangai-Noon and the changes made by Master Uechi and his students over winter break.  For now I hope to watch a few more videos like this to compare and contrast.

What do you see here?  What are some elements to the old style you know about already.  Please share here!

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About moaimartialarts

Lucky enough to grow up with the martial arts, I have felt their positive influence throughout my life and am especially interested in sharing these experiences with others. I enjoy working with youth and adults to give back some of what I've received. If you would like to learn more about Uechi-Ryu/Shohei-Ryu Karate, or if you want to find people to train with, please contact me. I am the head karate instructor for the Meriden Martial Arts Club.
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2 Responses to Pangai-Noon

  1. Michael Bacon says:

    The quality of the video is excellent, but the observer doesn’t really know if the interpretations of the techniques are in fact accurate. It appears to me to have a much larger influence from Kung fu rather than it’s historically accepted Tai chi, Pa-Kua and Hsing-I. The one thing missing from the demonstrations was any real sense of power which is the very heart of the art. For detailed insight into the three soft arts of the chinese influence seek out Robert W. Smith’s “Chinese Boxing: Masters and Methods”, “Pa-Kua: Chinese Boxing for Fitness and Self Defense”, and “Hsing-I: Chinese Mind-Body Boxing”. These are excellent reference materials.

    Michael Bacon
    Godan, Shoheiryu

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